Skip to main content

About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
CSPAN 7
CSPAN2 5
WHUT (Howard University Television) 4
WUSA (CBS) 2
KCSM (PBS) 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 26
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
energy. nhk world's tack hay coe asa i can reports from okinawa. >> reporter: propellers slowly turning under the surface of the sea. these could be the first step to the tapping of the energy of the ocean currents. it's part of an ambitious project led by professor tsumoru shintake and his team at okinawa institute of science and technology. the plan is to create a network of 300 huge propellers positioned a hundred meters under the surface. they could generate 1 million kilowatts, equivalent to the power from a nuclear reactor. the researchers want to top the power of the current which flows northward past the islands and along japan's pacific coast. this deep slow-moving current provides a constant flow of moving water, making it's deal for generating power. >> translator: once the turbines have been placed deep down in the current, we'll have a constant source of daily energy. >> reporter: the first step for his team is to test a small prototype turbine. the turbine is suspended under the water from a buoy on the surface. to replicate the current, the turbine is pulled through the w
for alternative sources of green energy. nhk world's tack yeah kawasaki reports from okinawa. >> reporter: propellers slowly turning under the surface of the sea. it could be the first step to capturing the energy of the ocean currents. it's part of an ambitious project led by a professor and his team at okinawa institute of science and technology. the plachb is to create a network of 300 huge propellers positioned a hundred meters under the surface. they could generate 1 million kilowatts, equivalent to the power from a nuclear reactor. the researchers want to top the power of the current by flows northward past the islands and along the coast. this deep slow-moving current provides a constant flow of moving water making it's deal for generating power. >> translator: once the turbines have been placed deep down in the current, we'll have a constant source of daily energy. >> reporter: the first step for the team is to test a small prototype turbine. the turbine is suspended under the water from a buoy on the surface. to replicate the current the turbine is pulled through the water at a c
on the island of okinawa where he hit a 13-year-old boy. he was taken to the hospital. now more on what happened. " this was supposed to have happened earlier today in the early hours on friday morning in okinawa, which is an island about 20,000 kilometers south of tokyo, where there are several very large u.s. military bases. the biggest u.s. military base in the asia-pacific region. what is alleged to have happened is a young airmen left a bar inside a building, climbed up to an apartment on a higher floor, on the third floor, broke inside, assaulted a 13-year-old boy, broke a television, then jumped from a window and broke some bones as he did so and the was then taken back to the u.s. base where he's being treated. this is a fairly small incident, but it comes after just two weeks ago, two airmen on okinawa were arrested and accused of raping a young japanese woman in police custody. relations between the u.s. military and the local population are extremely tense and have been for many years. so this just adds another incident on top of what is already a very bad situation. >> china's ruling
or at least outside okinawa prefecture, so he resigned in 2010. his government eventually agreed with the u.s. to move the facility to nago okinawa and that was similar to one signed in 2006 when the liberal democratic party held the reins of government. >>> north korean officials are trying to drum up more foreign investment. once again they turned to their main ally china and invited the heads of 40 chinese companies for a week long industrial tour. north krooe's foreign shechlt committee keeps a permanent office in beijing. it is headed by the you thinkel and mentor of leader kim jong un. the office invited the chinese executives to tour mines and lumber mills in and around pinyany. they're already active in north korea and helping to develop two economic sgroens in the north. the committee's work is seen as vital for jump starting a stagnant economy and hosted a trade fair last month in northeastern china. 100 north korean companies took part. >>> china's new leaders are settling in to their new jobs and starting to work through the challenges they face. the economy is their number one
. and there is a big agenda in u.s.-japan relations. there's the okinawa issue, the future of defense cooperation, the territorial problems that japan has in the region, the transpacific partnership. i could go on and on. a lot of these issues the president will want to engage japan, but the big question facing the obama administration is that, is there a functioning strong government in japan so that he can work with that government to solve these very complicated issues. >> as the professor points out, there are a lot of challenges. nhk world's political reporter engine ohka wa has more. >> japanese prime minister yoshihiko noda has con gralt lated the u.s. president and promised his cooperation. the administration will also welcome obama's second term. the u.s. will maintain international policies including focus on asia oovmts problems remain for japan-u.s. plans. there is the plan to relocate futenma air station. the deployment of the as sproe aircraft is another sticking point. defense officials have yet to convince local populations to accept training flights over their neighborhoods. in o
an incident involving misbehavior by u.s. troops allegedly on the island of okinawa. authorities on okinawa say a 24- year-old airman is suspected of entering an apartment and punching a young boy before falling out of the third floor window. he was allegedly drunk at the time and this incident comes a few weeks after two navy sailors were arrested and charged with raping local woman. >>> a 70-year-old california woman got really lucky twice. here's whyment she woke up $23 million richer after coming forward to claim her fortune months after the winning ticket was purchased. now the woman's daughter bought the ticket in may and gave it to her and she simply forgot about it. the second time she was lucky is because she didn't throw it out by accident. after a newspaper article the mom and daughter found the ticket and claimed the prize, the deadline was november 26th coming up. >> we need that luck mike. we need to bring that on. >>> the time right now is 4:38. somewhat wet morning is expected to give way to a sunny afternoon. that's going to be nice. howard is back in two minutes with your
are also starting to respond to the growing demand for low-cost flights. naha airport in okinawa also opened an lcc terminal in october, and narita airport outside tokyo plans to have a terminal for budget carriers by 2015. >> translator: the low-cost carrier market is growing rapidly. airports are also changing to accommodate the low-cost airlines. kansai airport aims to become a key hub to tab the rising demand around asia. >> reporter: airports around japan are now competing to attract more budget carriers. kansai airport is already looking ahead and has plans to build a second low-cost carrier terminal by 2015. kozue hamamoto, nhk world, osaka. >>> japan's national tax agency says that as of narch year the country's delinquent taxpayers owed the state $17 billion. the agency holds annual auctions of items it confiscates from nonpayers. this auction will include some interesting items. the opening bid for this 7.5 carat diamond has been set at a record high $510,000. experts say the gem's cut, color, and clarity are exceptional. vintage foreign sports cars and brand-name bags for c
will be coming back to the okinawa islands as well as taiwan. but rain in southwestern china will spread towards the east. going to be seeing the heaviest rain today. temperatures will be quite warmer than yesterday in beijing. 11 degrees expected. tokyo slightly cooler than seasonal with high of 17 degrees. rain will be clearing up by this evening. all right. moving into the americas then. a low pressure system is moving into british columbia once again. that's going to produce coastal rain and heavy mountain snow. expected to see as much as 30 centimeters of snowfall in the next 24 hours. even vancouver and seattle will turn wet from tomorrow. and then we have another system moving along the u.s./canada border spreading rain in the north dakota and south dakota. and snow showers in central canada. the system will continue to head towards the east and affect the western great lakes region on tuesday. we have a high pressure system over the great lakes region at this moment. this is a very troublesome system because it's dragging in colder air from the north. so temperatures are quite chilly for
to convince local population to accept training flights over their neighborhoods. in okinawa people are calling for stronger controls on u.s. troops after the recent sexual assault of a woman by u.s. servicemen. on the economy japanese officials will be preparing a response should the u.s. press japan into joining free trade talks for the transpacific partnership. there may be friction if the u.s. insists japan drop its tariffs. but overall, obama's win should be good for japan. there's the chance of stronger u.s. ties. with china relations gone sour over the senkaku islands conflict, that's sure to be reassuring. june oikawa, nhk world, tokyo. >>> chinese leaders have welcomed obama's re-election. nhk world reports from beijing. >> reporter: foreign ministry spokesperson said president hu jintao and premier wen jiabao each sent a congratulatory message to president obama. >> translator: we intend to keep working with the united states to further develop our relationship and cooperation. >> but the new leaders in beijing may have to brace for increased from the pressure from the u.s
the southern japanese prefecture of okinawa. he went to see the tower, which is dedicated to a unit of high school girls who served as nurses during world war ii. in nahi city, the dhe said many precious and innocent lives were lost in the atomic bombings of hiroshima and nagasaki. he said people must respect others with different views. >> now we should try, we should make an effort to build this century central with dialogue and peace. >> he said if each person finds peace within his or her heart and spreads that to their family and community, it should be bring about good results in 10 to 20 years. >>> the koala maybe the best loved animal, but in the east of the country its listed as a tleptenned species. over the past few decades the koala bear has been declining. >> this is the icon of australia, but it's a hospital where they care for injured and diseased koalas. the doctors are kept busy at this koala hospital to the north of sydney. every year around 200 koalas are brought in, most of them with injuries from accidents in residential areas. this koala was hit by a car in a residenti
and special thanks to general livingston and sal giunta.okinawa that was the bombing range and you made your pill gram image to pile's memorial there. that was something we had to do actually. i think it's still morning, good morning everybody. i got to thank jim for putting me between you and lunch. i've been that way a couple of time in the last two weeks. it will end on time. you had a wonderful experience so far since thursday. you've been exposed to some real american heroes i think for the younger people in the audience learned a lot about what it means to serve in the military, what kind of dedication and professionalism it takes. i want to talk first about the fact that i'm here alone this morning and how it would have been if i had still been in the military. we would have swooped up outside in a swirl of at least three cars. we would have piled out with security and i'd have an aid that would be nervous i would ask for something he didn't have. i don't know what he had in that bag but it was big and he always worried i'd ask for something he didn't have. i'd have my executive assis
minister hatoyama saw relations fray over the relocation of a u.s. base in okina okinawa. noda agreed with the u.s. to strengthen cooperation on bilateral security in the face of china's growing presence in the region. noda also made the controversial decision to restart nuclear reactors for the first time since fukushima. >> translator: i decided to restart nuclear reactors to protect people's way of life. >> reporter: dpj members who had supported noda criticized him. some even left the party. noda's biggest challenge was reforming japan's tax and social security systems. he publicly laid his political career on the line for this goal. influential party leaders strongly opposed noda's plans to increase the consumption tax. noda promised the main opposition, liberal democratic and komeito parties that he would dissolve the lower house when the bills passed. this enabled him to push them through in august. but noda never stated when he'd call an election. >> i will judge when to dissolve the lower house after the proper measures are in place. >> reporter: tensions increased when the p
have been reducing force levels there. there have been problems in okinawa. protests against our base and the troops there. we have been moving some folks around. we want to -- it appears we want to go into the philippines again. i don't know how much of a force we want to put in there. but depending on the philippine people who kicked usous originally back -- us out originally back in the early '80s and vietnam is a difficult card to play because you know there was a war. we did kill you know over a million vietnamese during the war and that hasn't been forgotten obviously and in singapore we have a rotation normal force there with the navy. it's -- >> so would it be fair to say that it's become with you the -- it's welcome but it's all in the details of the strategic relationship? >> sure, these country have grown up in the past 20, 30 years. they're no longer dependent on the united states. taiwan is has grown up and it has a modern military force. they're not so dependent on american military might as they were 20, 30, 40 years ago. >> >>> for decades, governments have demanded ei
's back if you use them. so we've come a long way. to my last assignment in okinawa. when i was flying f-15s and women started to enter the force and we were out on two of us good guys and two bad guys. one of the bad guys was a female f-15 pilot and i can remember my last sorty in okinawa kill the f-15 and she got behind me and won that particular engagement. so i think we ought to be proud of the fact that we have no tolerance for discrimination. it doesn't mean there is not but there is no tolerance for it. so it's two strikes and you're out of there. i don't think they give you three strikes anymore. they shouldn't. >> what else? shout out a characteristic. responsibility to piers and subordinates. >> i think that goes hand in hand with this notion of integrity and being responsible and there is a loyalty component i think is whey read into what you're talking about and you have to be loyal down as well as up. and my guess is you've worked for people that are very loyal up, not very loyal down. it's not a good feeling. it goes back to the selfless service idea. i think that's exactly
now in okinawa for instance. we are talking about the base in japan in okinawa where there have been far too many to count accusations of rape by u.s. soldiers against young women in okinawa. there is a huge environmental crisis outside of okinawa having to do with the bases that are being built. literally one of the bases, one of the great historic centers of art, renaissance art in italy has already a nato base in it and now the u.s. is trying to build a separate, and adjoining bays that would be within 100 yards of some of the great masterpieces of renaissance architecture. there is a huge move against that so when we talk about how do countries feel about our bases there we have to distinguish i think between the governments of sometimes allow them and the people that are outraged by them. that is even before we get to the question of what happens in the country where we have invaded? if we look for example at afghanistan we hear sometimes that we are there we are there to protect the women. let's look at what has really happened to women in afghanistan. when the taliban ruled af
as having environmental problems, social problems were created. there was a huge move under way in okinawa. where there have been far too many to count, accusations of rape against u.s. soldiers on young women in okinawa. there is a huge environmental crisis having to do with the bases being built. in italy, one of the bases in one of the great historic centers of renaissance art in italy already has a base in it. the u.s. is trying to build a separate base that would be within what a hundred yards of one of the great masterpieces of renaissance architecture. so, when we talk about how countries feel with our bases there, we have to distinguish between the government that allows them and the people that are outraged. that is before we get to the question of what happens in the countries where we have invaded. when you look at afghanistan, you hear that we are there to protect the women. look at what has happened to women in afghanistan. when the taliban ruled, the country was at the very bottom. the lowest level of where a woman could give birth and survive. according to unicef, it was als
weekend. world war ii. he was in on the invasion of okinawa. i got to go and stand on the beach that he stormed in on and my grandfather is still alive and i was able to get on a satellite phone and talk to him while standing on that beach and i asked him, you know, grandpa what were you thinking because, you know, i was overcome with emotion just crying thinking about what that must have been like. he said i was 19 years old, i was trying to live to be 20. still gets me kind of emotional. but that was the greatest generation. those were strong men and women and we owe our lives to them every day. >> clearly an emotional idea for you, i suspect for many of those warriors you're a hero but clearly for you they are the hero. >> there's no question. it is amazing when they tell you man i'm such a big fan, you're my idol or what have you. i flip that around on them and say no you're the hero. >> let me talk to you about another hero of yours. ted williams. why ted williams? >> i was originally a baseball player. i wanted to be a professional baseball player. i always adm
problems, social problems were created. there was a huge move under way in okinawa. where there have been far too many to count, accusations of rape against u.s. soldiers on young women in okinawa. there is a huge environmental crisis having to do with the bases being built. in italy, one of the bases in one of the great historic centers of renaissance art in italy already has a base in it. the u.s. is trying to build a separate base that would be within what a hundred yards of one of the great masterpieces of renaissance architecture. so, when we talk about how countries feel with our bases there, we have to distinguish between the government that allows them and the people that are outraged. that is before we get to the question of what happens in the countries where we have invaded. when you look at afghanistan, you hear that we are there to protect the women. look at what has happened to women in afghanistan. when the taliban ruled, the country was at the very bottom. the lowest level of where a woman could give birth and survive. according to unicef, it was also the lowest for a chil
back. we are going back to okinawa. >> one of the most important procedures is group psychotherapy. here come under the psychiatrist's guidance, the patient learns to understand something of the basic cause of his distress. >> i like to see if we can get some illustrations of how 1's personal safety can stem from -- one's personal safety can stem from titus safety. >> i kept to myself. > this weekend on c-span 3's, the john huston-directed, let there be light. watching this rarely-seen and was censored work sunday at 4:00 p.m. eastern-- once-censored work sunday at 4:00 p.m. >> students can win the grand prize of $5,000 by sending a message to the president. the competition is open to students grades 6-12. for complete details and rules, go online to studentcam.org. >> washington journal continues. host: ari shapiro is the author of the last great senate. he is here to talk to was about the issues facing the senate coming up in the next edition of the senate. welcome to the program. guest: is good to be here. host: tell us a bit about the book. the title, the last great senate. wha
. >> you are a deep sleep. we are going back now. going back to okinawa. >> one of the most important procedures is groups such a therapy. with a psychiatrist, the patient learns to understand the basic causes of his distress. >> i would like to see if we can get some illustrations of how one's personal safety would stem from childhood safety. >> i was ashamed to go to my parents and tell them what i had done. i kept it to myself. >> this weekend, the 1946 john huston-directed "let there be light," a documentary for the u.s. army on combat, and treatment. the rarely seen and once- censored work. >> i want my fiction to be intensely journalistic. intensely journalistic. unless you get out and look at what is going on these days, you are going to miss the things that are influencing yourself and everybody else. >> tom wolfe is live at 6:00 p.m. eastern. he will discuss his latest novel, back to blood, and his take on the city of miami, plus answer questions from the miami audience. david johnston looks at the ways corporations attempt to rob you blind. >> president obama's victory speec
66,000 soldiers assigned in the pacific. now, not all of them, so soldiers stationed in okinawa and japan, korea in hawaii, to have someone the west coast and alaska. so a significant capability that is forward. but the point you are making is a good one to so there's two aspects to assess that i think are important. one of things i think is important for us to engage and build strong relationship in the pacific region is for us to gain access in areas. where if overtime what i've learned as you will trust to do multilateral training, you do exchanges, it might enable us later on to access to some of these areas, if we need them in the future. and i think the army can help in delivering some of that. in terms of and access, forced entry operations is one that will continue to work very hard on. we are, as we are developing ourselves coming out of the last few wars we're focusing on forced entry operations. we have asked 18 -- to be the center of our capability to do forced entry operations in a variety of environments. of low-level to more significant levels of forced entry oper
shut, still got me swimming like a diver ♪ ♪ can't let go ♪ i got fans in okinawa high heart to japan quake losers and survivors ♪ ♪ noway no you didn't get my flowers ♪ ♪ you and i or jealousy was not oppressive ♪ ♪ oh, no, i can't stop ♪ i was destined i know, caught up in the middle ♪ ♪ i cry just a little ♪ when i think of letting go ♪ oh, no, gave up on the riddle ♪ ♪ i cry just a little ♪ when i think of letting go i know caught up in the middle ♪ ♪ i kris cry just a little when i think of let going ♪ ♪ oh, no, gave me up on the riddle ♪ ♪ i crijust a little when i think of letting go ♪ ♪ champagne buckets still got o tears in it ♪ ♪ and i put that on my tattoo of jimi hendrix ♪ ♪ get depressed cause the outfit all in it ♪ ♪ the press tell it all get a meal ticket ♪ ♪ clean next get a call just a little visit ♪ ♪ sacrifice just to make a hit still vivid ♪ ♪ ♪ no cheers i know you wouldn't panic ♪ ♪ i know, caught up in the middle ♪ ♪ i cry just a little ♪ when i think of letting go ♪ oh, no, gave u
minutes. >> thank you very much. and when i was stationed in okinawa that was the bombing range and you made your pill gram image to pile's memorial there. that was something we had to do actually. i think it's still morning, good morning everybody. i got to thank jim for putting me between you and lunch. i've been that way a couple of time in the last two weeks. it will end on time. you had a wonderful experience so far since thursday. you've been exposed to some real american heroes i think for the younger people in the audience learned a lot about what it means to serve in the military, what kind of dedication and professionism it takes. i want to talk first about the fact that i'm here alone this morning and how it would have been if i had still been in the military. we would have swooped up outside in a swirl of at least three cars. we would have piled out with security and i'd have an aid that would be neshes i would ask for something he didn't have. i'd have my executive assistant. i'd have a speech writer and the public affairs officer in case the media was going to stick a came
and then more seriously wounded in okinawa and lost the use of his left affirm he was an extraordinary man who refused to take his veterans' disability pay. he sent his checks back to the government every single amongst. he joked that you could do the work of a senator with one arm tied behind your back so it really wasn't fair for him to take disability pay. for too long we have tied our own hands with excessive ring correspondent and partisanship. i hope that at least on the issue of helping owrd vitiates we can come together on a bipartisan basis. i ask consent that the next statement i am about to make be in a separate part of record. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. durbin: it was 101 years ago when my grandmother came to this country with three small children. they landed in baltimore from lithuania and came down the steps into america for the first time. the year was 1911. i don't know how my grandmother managed to navigate her way to east st. louis, illinois, to meet my grandfather with those three little kids and not speaking a word of english. but she did. so it's with s
okinawa to hawaii? it's clear that the footprint of marines in the western pacific is changing and is going to change in the rotation of the deployment aspect to australia our job would be to provide the maritime left for the marines and a rotation of the deployed to the door when australia. that will grow and will double and grow towards the end of the decade by 2020 will have a marine expeditionary unit size about 2500 deploying their. it would be to ann readiness group at that time to provide the left and provide them the means of working together to operate in the southeast asia. >> how close are the chinese to the navy base nuclear capability and should the u.s. be worried? i would say that bringing on a nuclear program we certainly learned that throughout the years we certainly say a vigilant is where i would say i'm very confident in our ability to operate wherever we need to in the undersea domain. can the u.s. navy build and maintain the pivot to the pacific. there's a set of missions that we are required to bring forward this is all underwritten by what we call the gl
is changing and is going to change. that lay down is described and will evolve from okinawa toward guam in a rotational deployment aspect to australia. we will provide the maritime with for marine who will deploy to darwin, australia. there are 250 marines exercising with the australians. that will grow until toward the end of the decade. by "20/20, will have a marine expeditionary unit of about 2500 rotation we deployed. we will bring a group to provide the list and provide them the means of working together to operate in south east asia. >> how close are the chinese to our navy base nuclear capabilities? so should the u.s. be wary? >> the chinese do have nuclear submarines. i would say that it is difficult bringing on a nuclear program. we learned that throughout the years. vigilance is where i would say is the right term. were rate is not quite yet. i am confident in our ability to operate in the domain. >> can the u.s. navy maintain the fleet required to the pacific? >>in the distrust -- defense strategic guidance, there are a set of attributes of of missions we are required to brin
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)